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Can I replace 15uf capacitor with 22uf?

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    Can I replace 15uf capacitor with 22uf?

    "If I wanted to replace an old 15uF/400V capacitor with a new one,
    I have a new 15uF/400V and a new 22uF/400V capacitor. When measured, the new 15uF reads only 13uF, and the 22uF reads only 20uF. Can I use the 22uF capacitor?"

    #2
    Depends on how it's being used. If it's just a smps primary bulk filter cap, usually that would work fine.

    Comment


      #3
      Electrolytic capacitors typically are +/-20%, a fact that system designers take into account in their designs. So your new 15uF capacitor is within spec.
      PeteS in CA

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        #4
        Good question. Which to use
        Click image for larger version

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          #5
          Capacitor manufacturers are very good at making their parts exactly at the low end, so I find they all measure -19.9% lol. Why give extra?
          For the new part, it depends on how many watts the PSU is. I find chinese use the smallest possible value and so the cap runs hot from ripple current and has a short life, which might be why the 15uF part died. 120VAC 25W with 15uF it gets HOT.
          Also inrush current with a 22uF cap can be high and make quite a spark when you plug in. Does the PSU have an NTC inrush limiter or resistor etc. ? Without it on 240VAC I would expect a crackle.

          Comment


            #6
            "To complete this, differences from 14uF to 19.9uF are negligible, especially when there are 2 of them. This concerns a 230V refrigerator board that is 20 years old. Given that the refrigerator runs day and night, it's surprising that the capacitors have lasted 20 years."
            Attached Files

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              #7
              I've made it that way.
              It works fine.
              Thank you all for your good advice. Thank you Richard for new video about caps
              Attached Files

              Comment


                #8
                I'm confused - you show a fridge board pic with new 22uF primary caps and small electrolytics for the rest. Then a fridge board pic with 15uF primary caps and polymers for the rest.
                Electrolytics are a downgrade, especially if the board is cold.

                Who is Richard? What video? What make/model is the fridge?

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