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Can i plug pc on this apartment with older fuse box?

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    #21
    Originally posted by sew333 View Post
    Oki so nothing will happen when i plug pc to that one with older fuses?
    for safety sake get it tested before you use it .

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      #22
      oki so maybe choose that apartment? Here room is smaller but have new electrics and new fuses,screen:
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        #23
        Originally posted by sew333 View Post
        Oki so nothing will happen when i plug pc to that one with older fuses?
        Yes, assuming the wiring is correct. Fuses aren't inherently bad (aside from idiots playing the " the fuse keeps blowing so I'll just put in a bigger one" game), but they do indicate and older electric system that may warrant further investigation (in the case of the US they generally mean Knob and Tube or early fabric wrapped NM cable that is prone to getting brittle/falling apart with age, since we largely switched to breakers in the 1950s). Since you're running on 230V, even at full load that 1600W PSU would only be drawing around 7A, though realistically a 14900K and RTX4090 as power hungry as they are should only draw around 800W-900W (3.5A-4A @230V) under full load.



        Originally posted by petehall347
        for safety sake get it tested before you use it .
        ^This, is never a bad idea if in doubt.

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          #24
          Someone said this to me:"i'm not an electrician, but it would be too dangerous for me"

          So its dangerous or oki will be?

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            #25
            Yes, it's OK. Old fuses don't matter because a PC has one inside. As long as there is a proper ground at the plug.

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              #26
              just get a test-plug.
              https://www.tme.eu/gb/details/ut07b-...testers/uni-t/
              and yes, i see it's out of stock but they are getting more in the next week or 2

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                #27
                Having moved over from USA to Europe recently (I suppose I should update my profile location any day now ), perhaps I can shine some light on this as well.

                First off, forget the electrical stuff. This is Europe after all, and most buildings are made with concrete / bricks, so huge electrical fires like in North American wood construction are pretty much unheard of.
                The most "problematic" thing you might run into is that older apartments / construction generally don't have proper or any grounding for the outlets. By older, I mean Soviet era.

                Most of these buildings have only 2-wire runs for the outlets and lights - Live ("hot") and Neutral. Ground wiring (to each outlet, not the apartment itself) is generally non-existent. In most cases, any "grounded" outlet you see either will have floating ground (i.e. ground not connected to anything) or ground connected to Neutral in each outlet (very common in the kitchen and bathroom areas to avert any metal-cased appliance from becoming "hot", should a fault develop and allow Live to conduct to the chassis of the appliance.) The latter practice is considered unsafe in many countries electrical codes nowadays and not done on new buildings anymore... but new construction has proper 3-conductor runs with a ground to each outlet anyways, so this "hack" is not needed. It's still done in old building, though. Of course, an old building / apartment could have been rewired & updated at some point... but there's still no guarantee the contractors did a proper job with upgrading the wire runs with 3-conductor wires or simply just replaced the breaker with a newer one and left the old 2-conductor runs as-is (the case of the apartment where I live.) That being said, the only thing that a newer breaker panel might add in terms of safety is if it has GFCI breakers. This way, non-grounded outlets now become much safer in the event there is a ground fault with any device. Thus, they are generally safer, particularly in the kitchen or in areas with metal chassis appliances and devices.

                That being said, CapLeaker is 100% right in that the age and type of the breaker panel alone is generally irrelevant. Indeed you can have a new building with new panel and pretty bodged up wiring or an old building with a perfectly fine old breaker (or "fuse box", as in the case of the first picture shown) and wiring. It really comes down to who did the install and how much they were in a hurry. The worst one I've heard of over here is when installers mis-wired Neutral and one of the phases in a new condo construction, sending 380V to some outlets. You can imagine how that went down with most electronics plugged into such outlets.

                Anyways, in short, your PC will be FINE regardless of which apartment you chose.

                So again, forget about the electrical stuff and focus on getting an apartment with the better price and better features.

                Poland, as far as I know (correct me if I'm wrong, since I live quite a bit further South in Europe from you) is not a very warm place in the winter, or even in the other seasons, except for summer perhaps. Thus, if I were you, my absolute #1 priority would be in regards to the insulation of the apartment (if any), along with the age of the windows and the heating system used (all electric or hot water radiators?) Then there's other aspects, such as, is the apartment in a convenient location of the city/town, its physical location in the building (being in the middle of other apartments, as CapLeaker mentioned), and relative orientation of most rooms (i.e. North? South? East? West?) If you like staying warm, pick the one that has the better insulation, better windows, and the one with the most windows outlooking to South or South-ish. If you are buying the apartment rather than renting, you might be able to add insulation down the road if there isn't any (applies to most Soviet -era buildings only.) These things can save you quite a bit of $$ down the road.

                Case in point: I live in an old Soviet -era concrete condo, but do have good insulation and lots of South-looking windows. On a sunny day, even in freezing temperatures in the winter, I can still turn Off the heating system during the day in rooms that overlook South - that's how much of a difference good insulation + South view can make! Thus, the heating costs I pay tend to be almost 2-3x less than what my uncle pays. And these aren't insignificant cost either. For a good number of people that live here, heating costs can take away a good chunk of their salary in the coldest of months.

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                  #28
                  Originally posted by sew333 View Post
                  Oki so nothing will happen when i plug pc to that one with older fuses?
                  Buy yourself a test plug like stj already mentioned for like 30 euros and plug it into all outlets. That will tell you if something is a miss in the wiring. You should do this to any place your are going to live in anyway. A few month ago I found a bad plug in my sons boarding school apartment.
                  luckily he didn't plug anything in as the neutral was missing! Such a jig comes in very handy.
                  What did I miss? momaka I thought you were in Europe but seeing your location for a moment I thought you moved back to the states, LOL

                  And as long the plug is properly wired and the fuse panel itself good in shape, NOTHING will happen to your computer using any fuse panel new or old!
                  Last edited by CapLeaker; 04-03-2024, 04:56 PM.

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                    #29
                    Oki. Thank you so much for helping and replies. Really greafful. In next tuesday i am going to notary to buy apartment.That one:
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                    Thanks again. And sorry for my bad language.

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