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Old 02-15-2017, 05:15 PM   #1
Spork Schivago
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Default Using my CH341A.

Hello,

I bought my CH341APro and it arrived in the mail today. It's very similar to this one: https://tosiek.pl/wp-content/uploads...programmer.jpg

It's the same colour and has the same components, but the three caps in the upper left of the board in the picture are all aligned, but on mine, the third one is a bit further down physically on the board. I probably have some clone or something.

Anyway, I want to try dumping the firmware on this 25Q16BSIG. The pins I have on the 25Q16BSIG are:

CS#, SO, WP#, VSS, VCC, HOLD#, SCLK, and SI.

I'm not going to be using the ZIF socket but the headers to hook to my 25Q16BSIG. On the underside of the CH341A, I see the pins are header pins are labeled like this:
Code:
5V		5V
3.3V		GND
GND		RXD
MIOS	TXD
MOSI	3
CS		2
CLK		1
I see where it says 1-2 are something, but it's in Chinese. 2-3 are for TTL (and then there's chinese). This SPI flash chip has a full voltage range of 2.7VDC ~ 3.6VDC, so I'm going to leave it on 1-2. I'm assuming TTL is for 5V TTL logic devices.

RXD and TXD, to me, are transmit and receive for serial devices. I'm wondering if maybe the left side, that has the 5V pin, the 3.3V pin, the GND, MIOS, MOSI, CS, and CLK pins are for this type of chip and maybe the other side with the 5V, GND, RXD, and TXD are for some other type of chip.

I'm thinking I should hook the 3.3V pin to the VCC pin on the SPI flash chip, the GND to VSS, the CS to the CS# on the chip, the CLK to the SCLK on the chip....but then what? MIOS to the SO pin on the chip and MOSI to the SI pin on the chip? Or vice-versa? Or do I hook the TXD to the SO (data output) and the RXD to the SI (data input)?

Everyone on-line seems to just put the chip in the ZIF or use the soldering PCB that came with it. Any suggestions?
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Old 02-15-2017, 05:41 PM   #2
Spork Schivago
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

I figured it out using the continuity meter.
Code:
chip       adapter
------------------
CS#   ->   CS
SO    ->   MIOS
WP#   ->   3.3V
VSS   ->   GND
VCC   ->   3.3V
HOLD# ->   3.3V
SCLK  ->   CLK
SI    ->   MOSI
Because I only have one 3.3V jumper, I think what I'm going to do is just use the head strips that came with it and put them into the ZIF socket and then use my jumper wires and connect them to those header pins in the ZIF socket, then use my 8-pin adapter to click onto the SPI flash chip and try to read it.
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Old 02-15-2017, 06:26 PM   #3
Spork Schivago
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

I wonder if I can dump something like this:

http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datashe...-10SE-2.7.html

With this device. I have a TV I can't order the same replacement board for. I have one, came from the same make and model TV, but is different a little, believe it or not! I'm wondering if I switch the EEPROMs around if the newer replacement board would work....while I'm at it though, I'd like to dump the EEPROMs. It'd be nice if I could do that using this device.

Last edited by Spork Schivago; 02-15-2017 at 07:01 PM..
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Old 02-16-2017, 09:58 AM   #4
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

What worries me is those address lines. My CH341A has markings for two different types of chips, 25 SPI BIOS and 24 I2C EEPROM

These Atmel chips have the numbers 24 in them, so I'm thinking it can maybe read and write to them, but there's no header pins for addresses. I believe the 24 I2C EEPROMs use the TXD and RXD header pins, not the MOSI and MIOS. I think I'm going to try it though. Worse case, I ruin one of the chips. Worse case, I just unsolder the EEPROMs from the bad board and put them on the good board. I'll try dumping the EEPROM from the good board, the one that doesn't seem to work with this TV, and see what happens.
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:00 AM   #5
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Blah! I can't dump this EEPROM. The software supports the Atmel chip I'm trying to dump, the 24C04A. I've tried multiple versions of the software. Every time, I have to add an exception to my Anti-virus program because it flags it as a virus, even Stj's upload. I don't think it's a virus, just a false positive. The newer version of the software (version 1.29) says there's no driver, but device manager shows the device under Ports (COM and LPT) as a USB-SERIAL CH341A (COM3).

It's a SMAKN® USB Programmer CH341A. This sucks. I don't know if the chip is bad, or if it's a driver issue or a software issue or what. I figured if it had the CH341 in it, any of the softwares would work, but maybe I need something specifically for this device. And of course, the people who made it don't have drivers or software. They say to use Google.

Any suggestions? I wish Stj was here!
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:18 AM   #6
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Did you get the little board with the header pins ?
Start with something we know can be read the 25Q16BSIG. Solder it to the little board add the header pins and plug it into the ZIF.
It needs putting in the correct part of the ZIF as indicated by the screenprint.
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:26 AM   #7
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

This is stupid. I found a video with download links for the software and drivers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NYe21nFSDI

I install the drivers, still nothing. I decide to watch the video, just for shits and giggles. About half way through, the guy says the jump has to be on pins 1-2, otherwise it won't work. He's right. Even though the board says jumper 1-2 is for 3.3V and my chip I'm currently trying to read requires 5V, for some reason, when I have it on 2-3, I get device not detected. But when I switched it to 1-2 (3.3V), now I can read, write, erase, blank, all of that!
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:40 AM   #8
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

This might help you.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf CH341A datasheet.pdf (219.8 KB, 159 views)
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Old 02-16-2017, 01:14 PM   #9
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Keeney123,

I got it working. The problem wasn't with the drivers or the CH341A chip, but the actual PCB. The jumper has to be set on pins 1-2 (for 3.3V). The guy in the video explains it nicely. Makes me wonder why and if there's a problem with the PCB.

I bought the device from Amazon and left a review and comment, telling people about the issue, giving them a link to the software and drivers (32-bit and 64-bit). It seems a lot of people who bought this device where asking where to get the software and drivers from and no one seemed to know (or if they did, they didn't respond!)
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Old 02-16-2017, 03:06 PM   #10
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spork Schivago View Post
Keeney123,

I got it working. The problem wasn't with the drivers or the CH341A chip, but the actual PCB. The jumper has to be set on pins 1-2 (for 3.3V). The guy in the video explains it nicely. Makes me wonder why and if there's a problem with the PCB.

I bought the device from Amazon and left a review and comment, telling people about the issue, giving them a link to the software and drivers (32-bit and 64-bit). It seems a lot of people who bought this device where asking where to get the software and drivers from and no one seemed to know (or if they did, they didn't respond!)

Glad you got it working!
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Old 09-04-2019, 05:30 AM   #11
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Hello!
I bought myself a CH341 Mini programmer (black mobo) and a SOIC 8 clip to use it for hot programming an 93c56 EEPROM , and I'm stuck because I don't know how to connect the 93cxx EEPROM to the programmer. At first, I used an old video card to test the CH431A how it's working so I connected the SOIC Clip's interface to the slot for 25XX with the no 1 pin to the left upper corner of the CH341a's ZIF lock, I attached the miniclip to the 8 pins of the videocard's EEPROM (with the red wire of the clip to the EEPROM pin no 1 - marked on the videocard with "1"), and then I connected the mini programmer to the USB of my desktop pc. The software v.1.29 shows "device connected", but nothing happens when I press the button to identify the chip. Further more, the ch341a heats up so I had to disconnect it from the usb port. I don't know what am I doing wrong.... Can someone help me, please?
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Old 10-12-2021, 11:07 PM   #12
beekerc69
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

can you share exactly how you got the 3.3v working?
what pins you tied together or what jumper settings you used?
Thanks
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Old 10-13-2021, 12:28 PM   #13
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beekerc69 View Post
can you share exactly how you got the 3.3v working?
what pins you tied together or what jumper settings you used?
Thanks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hwnz...nnel=AdamantIT
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Old 02-17-2017, 12:36 PM   #14
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Yeah, me too! I've been talking to the developer of the CH341 Programmer for Windows. I purchased a registered copy. He only wanted 10$. I gave him 15$. He says for 10$, it'll include future updates, which is nice. I felt it was worth it. Anyway, I asked if he ever planned on making a Linux version, he said right now there's no Linux drivers.

I found a Linux module in the kernel but it's only for serial support. These devices also have an IEEE 1284 parallel interface, an SPI interface, and an I2C interface. It was created by some smart people studying the Windows driver. I reached out to the company who makes the Windows drivers, asking if they'd ever consider releasing the source code for the drivers so I can port them or if they'd be interested in releasing a Linux version, but I don't have my hopes up.

I also reached out to the guy who developed the current CH341 kernel module, asking if he ever planned on implementing the other features. Hopefully someone will provide some good news.

Have you ever thought about purchasing one of these? They're kinda neat.
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Old 03-03-2017, 09:19 PM   #15
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spork Schivago View Post
Yeah, me too! I've been talking to the developer of the CH341 Programmer for Windows. I purchased a registered copy. He only wanted 10$. I gave him 15$. He says for 10$, it'll include future updates, which is nice. I felt it was worth it. Anyway, I asked if he ever planned on making a Linux version, he said right now there's no Linux drivers.

I found a Linux module in the kernel but it's only for serial support. These devices also have an IEEE 1284 parallel interface, an SPI interface, and an I2C interface. It was created by some smart people studying the Windows driver. I reached out to the company who makes the Windows drivers, asking if they'd ever consider releasing the source code for the drivers so I can port them or if they'd be interested in releasing a Linux version, but I don't have my hopes up.

I also reached out to the guy who developed the current CH341 kernel module, asking if he ever planned on implementing the other features. Hopefully someone will provide some good news.

Have you ever thought about purchasing one of these? They're kinda neat.


No, I will leave that to you genus Programmers. I just like to dabble and help where I can. When it gets warm enough I am going Undercoat my car, go to a stream and paint what I see. If my sister can not find someone to chop up this log that's 3.5 feet in diameter and 10 feet long then I will have to do it for her. Then there is the 3.5 foot stump to deal with.
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Old 09-04-2019, 05:58 AM   #16
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

firstly, 24 series and 93 series chips have no id for the programmer to read. that only works on 25 series.
second, you cant program or read a chip on board unless you can isolate it's power pin or the usb programmer will try to power the whole device!
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Old 09-04-2019, 08:39 AM   #17
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Cool Re: Using my CH341A.

Thank you for the quick response, Stj!
Quote:
Originally Posted by stj View Post
firstly, 24 series and 93 series chips have no id for the programmer to read. that only works on 25 series.
That means that I will have to choose from the drop down list the 93c56 EEPROM that I want to read/programm? what if I don't find it listed? Can I select another with similar memory size?
Quote:
Originally Posted by stj View Post
second, you cant program or read a chip on board unless you can isolate it's power pin or the usb programmer will try to power the whole device!
I read on internet that it can be done on board, all I need is to short the crystal oscillator without any other modifications (the 93c56 is on a car ECM). If it can be done, why did they make a SOIC Clip? On the internet its advertised that with this clip one can programm the EEPROM without any desoldering.
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Old 09-04-2019, 09:56 AM   #18
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy90 View Post
I read on internet that it can be done on board, all I need is to short the crystal oscillator without any other modifications (the 93c56 is on a car ECM). If it can be done, why did they make a SOIC Clip? On the internet its advertised that with this clip one can programm the EEPROM without any desoldering.
Shorting the crystal will help by stoping the micro from trying to acces the eeprom/spi ic at the same time, but you still have to power everything connected to vcc of the eeprom. Some pc's usb can't supply enough current for this and you may need to use a seperate +5v supply.
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Old 09-05-2019, 11:55 PM   #19
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Question Re: Using my CH341A.

Ok, thank you for your inputs.
Supposedly that I have a new 93c56B EEPROM, how do I have to connect it to the CH341a in order to program it? From the 93c56 datasheet I can see no match between the pin configuration of 93c56 EEPROM and the ZIF lock of the CH341a PCB.
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Old 09-06-2019, 02:23 AM   #20
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Default Re: Using my CH341A.

does the software list it?
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