Badcaps.net Forum
Go Back   Badcaps Forums > General Topics > General Computer & Tech Discussion
Register FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-28-2020, 12:05 PM   #41
Dan81
SNES-powered
 
Dan81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
City & State: Romania
My Country: Bacau
Line Voltage: 230VAC 50Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 1,195
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

I still have two Seagate drives in my main PC (2x Barracuda ES.2, ST31000340NS - one is Seagate normal, and the other is a IBM branded drive) and both are near brand new condition (I think the normal Seagate one has 1 bad sector and that was solely caused by me). 10 seconds for both to spin up, 5 second each.

As for platters, some WDs were way worse. I've had a 1TB WD Blue (Apple branded no less) LITERALLY pass the seek test with the platters looking the same as momaka's 1.5TB drives.
__________________
Main rig:
Gigabyte B75M-D3H
Core i5-3470 3.60GHz
Gigabyte Geforce GTX650 1GB GDDR5
16GB DDR3-1600
Samsung SH-224AB DVD-RW
FSP Bluestorm II 500W (recapped)
120GB ADATA + 2x Seagate Barracuda ES.2 ST31000340NS 1TB
Delux MG760 case
Dan81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2020, 02:11 PM   #42
eccerr0r
Solder Sloth
 
eccerr0r's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
City & State: CO
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120VAC 60Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 5,136
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan81 View Post
normal Seagate one has 1 bad sector and that was solely caused by me
Do tell how you created exactly one bad sector, this will be interesting

Or is there the possibility of more damage than just that one sector?
eccerr0r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2020, 07:38 PM   #43
TechGeek
Computer Geek
 
TechGeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
City & State: Hell's Front Porch, Texas
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120/2/[email protected]
I'm a: Hardcore Geek
Posts: 1,634
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by eccerr0r View Post
Do tell how you created exactly one bad sector, this will be interesting

Or is there the possibility of more damage than just that one sector?
Likely toying with hdparm and it's
Code:
--make-bad-sector
option.
__________________
Don't buy those $10 PSU "specials". They fail, and they have taken whole computers with them.

For computer parts, go to Newegg
OR
Amazon.

For electrical stuff(pushbuttons, capacitors, etc), use Digikey
OR
Mouser.

My computer doubles as a space heater.

Windows 10? Only if you like forced, buggy updates and 24/7 telemetry.

Samsung = Seagate = Seatrash = Trashgate
Don't buy Seagate drives. Don't use Seagate drives. If you have any in service right now, make plans to replace them ASAP.


TechGeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2020, 09:50 PM   #44
momaka
master hoarder
 
momaka's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
City & State: VA (NoVA)
My Country: U.S.A.
Line Voltage: 120 VAC, 60 Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 9,752
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by TechGeek View Post
I junked every Seagate in the house a long time ago, except my dad's old external and a 2004-era 40GB drive, which resides in my Network Bridge Machine.
Eh, don't get me wrong - I still don't mind Seagate HDDs. But all of their newer HDDs (as in, made in the past 10 years), I don't trust. Many seem to develop bad sectors too quickly or just can't read/write anymore, despite SMART passing all parameters with flying colors. And then there's the above 7200.10 HDDs that just plain-straight fail dismally.

Seems the more capacity they've been packing, the less reliable they have become. (Not that this surprises me in any way - more data per given area means smaller and smaller target zones for the heads, and smaller heads riding closer to the surface than ever before.)

Their 7200.9 series is more or less where I draw the line on their reliability, with some of the 7200.9 drives being... well, not so reliable, but still miles better than anything that came after. All in all, though, the 7200.9 line is OK.

7200.7? I'll use and trust any day (not to say I won't keep backups or never expect it to fail, of course.)

Barracuda ATA V, IV, and III? - Same as 7200.7 - old, but reliable workhorses. Too bad they only came in IDE and SCSI variants. At least 7200.7 came in SATA as well.

I also found an old 40 MB (MegaByte) Seagate ST-251 5.25" in the scrap pile at work. Someone removed its top a long time ago just to look at the inside and never put it back on. The thing was dusty as heck when I found it. I gave it a gentle wipe with alcohol. After this, I powered it on, just for shits and giggles and guess what? IT WORKS!!! Seeks, positions, and is ready to work another day... even though I have no system to connect it to. It's a beautiful piece of hardware and makes an awesome boot-up sound. Took it home and definitely keeping it for my retro collection of old PC stuff. No way I could let them get that scrapped.

Last edited by momaka; 05-28-2020 at 09:53 PM..
momaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2020, 10:40 PM   #45
BigTroll
Badcaps Veteran
 
BigTroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
City & State: Jefferson
My Country: LAMBDA SOND
Line Voltage: 120VAC 60Hz
I'm a: Hardcore Geek
Posts: 1,078
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

the last seagates I thought were any good and I would see over 50k hours with no problems were the 7200.7 series, I also loved how loud they were.
__________________
My Computer: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X, Asrock X370 Killer SLI/AC, 16GB Geil EVO X DDR4 3000, 500GB WD Black NVME and 2TB Toshiba HD,EVGA GTX 1080 SC, In-Win 303 White, EVGA SuperNova 750 G3, Windows 10 Pro
BigTroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2020, 11:22 PM   #46
RJARRRPCGP
Badcaps Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
City & State: North Springfield, Vermont
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 118-127V 59-63.5 Hz-> actualizo: pťrdido de voltaje
I'm a: Knowledge Seeker
Posts: 5,331
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

I had what I think was a lemon 7200.7 in 2005. I bought it at the Claremont, New Hampshire Wal-Mart, on May 14, 2005, IIRC. I returned it on June 2, 2005, after I was hearing a random squeaking when seeking and utilities expecting HDD failure in less than 1 year, IIRC!

June 2, 2005, was when I came across the Maxtor 6Y060P0, which are virtually unkillable! Those are not the "slimeline" Maxtors.
__________________
MSI B450 Tomahawk

Ryzen 7 "Matisse" 3700X

16 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 SDRAM

Zotac GeForce GTX 1660

eVGA Supernova G3 750W






"There's nothing more unattractive than a chick smoking a cigarette" -Topcat

"Don't eat yellow snow!" -Salem

"did I see a chair fly? I think I did! Time for popcorn!" -ratdude747
RJARRRPCGP is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 12:09 AM   #47
eccerr0r
Solder Sloth
 
eccerr0r's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
City & State: CO
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120VAC 60Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 5,136
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by TechGeek View Post
Likely toying with hdparm and it's
Code:
--make-bad-sector
option.
but he could just --repair-sector and it's no longer bad because it wasn't really bad to begin with?
eccerr0r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 01:51 AM   #48
Dan81
SNES-powered
 
Dan81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
City & State: Romania
My Country: Bacau
Line Voltage: 230VAC 50Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 1,195
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by eccerr0r View Post
Do tell how you created exactly one bad sector, this will be interesting

Or is there the possibility of more damage than just that one sector?
I shut off my PC from the PSU switch every time I am done working on it. That's how.
Dan81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2020, 12:56 PM   #49
eccerr0r
Solder Sloth
 
eccerr0r's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
City & State: CO
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 120VAC 60Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 5,136
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

interesting...thought for the most part hard drives shouldn't kill themselves by doing that...
eccerr0r is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 01:14 PM   #50
Xenon-Codex
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
City & State: Kontiolahti
My Country: Finland
I'm a: Knowledge Seeker
Posts: 53
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

This 7200.11 failed at quite high power on hours. It was not recognized by any computer, until one last time it started and I got all data recovered. It came to me from trash, and I used it at least 3 years as my main HD (for photos etc).
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ST3750330AS 16.6.2018.jpg (75.6 KB, 24 views)

Last edited by Xenon-Codex; 06-16-2020 at 01:17 PM..
Xenon-Codex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2020, 11:38 AM   #51
Dan81
SNES-powered
 
Dan81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
City & State: Romania
My Country: Bacau
Line Voltage: 230VAC 50Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 1,195
Default Re: A Colossal HDD Failure

Try resetting SMART. Saved a 2TB drive that way.
Dan81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2020, 07:22 PM   #52
momaka
master hoarder
 
momaka's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
City & State: VA (NoVA)
My Country: U.S.A.
Line Voltage: 120 VAC, 60 Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 9,752
Talking A Colossal HDD Failure - Part 3 / SOUNDS

Perhaps only hardcore geeks may appreciate this post, as I am including an attached file with the *sounds* from the two failed HDDs. Hope you enjoy.
failed HDD sounds (112 kbps mp3) ZIP file

Whatís interesting is that while the 2nd HDD was in storage, the heads (or whatever was left of them on the actuator arm) got stuck to the platter, so the HDD couldnít spin up and made this beeping noise instead (which I recorded as well. ) I opened the 2nd HDD up and gave it a manual spin, then closed it and recorded the sounds.

And what do you know, it works now!
.
.
.
.
.
Nah, just kidding.
Both HDDs are still dead as a rock.

In any case, I decided to disassemble the 2nd HDD and clean it, as I had a project in mind for it. So the first thing to come out for the cleaning was the headstack assembly. Notice the missing heads. I found a few of them (in pieces) stuck to the actuator arm magnet.


While at it, I noticed the bearing on the actuator arm had some seriously rough spots when turning it by hand (suggesting failing/failed bearing.) I wonder if this is from wear from high # of power On hours. Perhaps this is what caused the heads to touch the platters? Or was this rather a consequence of when the heads got ripped off from the actuator arm and the force from that damaging the bearing? As you may recall, I mentioned in the first post that as I had the 1st HDD running for the first time, it made a loud *whack* noise after spinning for a while. When that happened, the HDD jumped a little from where it was resting (perhaps that was most likely another / the last of the heads getting ripped off?) If this happened, I imagine the actuator arm bearing saw quite a bit of force exerted on it.

Another thing I noticed while removing the actuator arm from the 2nd HDD is that I didnít need to loose the screw on the bottom of the bearing. Once I removed the top screw (that holds the actuator arm bearing through the top cover), the screw holding the bearing from the bottom was already loose. You can actually see it in the pictures shown below that itís still sticking up from the bottom. Normally getting to that screw requires removing the PCB and also a few shiny warranty-like stickers.

This makes me wonder, since this is a refurbished HDD, if someone at Seagate didnít torque the bottom actuator arm bearing screw properly. And if so, perhaps this is what led to the head crash. After all, why did both of these refurbished HDDs crash the same way? Given where the HDDs came from (CCTV recording equipment), they probably had high # of power On hours and probably a good number of reads/writes (though nothing excessive, I imagine, as the footage was low bit rate.) Still, I donít think that kind of wear alone could loosen the bottom bearing screw. Or could it?

Anyways, I gutted all of the ďunnecessaryĒ components away from the 2nd HDD (for the project I will show a bit later.) With that saidÖ let me just warn everyone once more - DO NOT get that fine platter dust on anything you care about! Itís really fine stuff and really hard to wash out. I imagine itís probably bad if you breathe it in too, given how fine it is. Luckily, itís magnetic and prefers to stick to metal surfaces rather than stay too long in the air. But it can stay up for a little. Regardless, DO NOT breathe that dust in!

Also, this dust was so fine and sticky that I couldnít just brush it off (and for the above reasons, I had no reason to anyways.) Thus, to get the HDD clean, I had to remove all of the platters and wipe everything down with damp paper towels soaked in soapy solution. Here are a few more pictures I snapped while doing that. (BTW, notice the scratching occurred on ALL platters and not just the top one.)




Kind of ironic about the cleaning part, given the project this HDD will be used for.
Stay tuned!
momaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Badcaps.net Technical Forums © 2003 - 2020
Powered by vBulletin ®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:57 AM.
Did you find this forum helpful?