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Old 09-14-2017, 04:07 PM   #661
goontron
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Default Re: Your Best Dumpster Finds

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Yessir....well really close anyway. Running a Pentium Classic 166 @ 250/100 rock solid in a super7 board. Ran some celeron 366's @ 550 (abit bp6). Ran a Tillamook 266 @ 400/100 in the same super7 board as the P-166...now what CPU did you doubleclock from 600 to 1.2? I'm warming up the BS flag on that one.
http://gadgets.ndtv.com/huawei-m865-64

I still have the phone, its unstable at full voltage/stock clock now and the battery is dead.... Along with the network it ran on......

I also no longer have the files to restore it to a non-stock state, which makes me sad.
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Old 09-16-2017, 01:09 PM   #662
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Default Re: Your Best Dumpster Finds

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Samsung UN55ES7500 with stand and remote. Not a scratch on it and absolutely nothing wrong with it. I seriously don't know what makes someone wake up one day and say to themselves "I just can't stand that gorgeous, big, smart, 3D 1080p, 240Hz any longer - I'm going to put it in the car and drive it down to the electronics recycling drop off". Owner of this thing has probably been divorced 3 or 4 times I'd guess.

I just wish they'd have brought the Bluetooth active 3D glasses too 'cause I don't have any of those. I only have the passive ones that came with the LG that I bought some years ago.
Awesome find! I have enjoyed this wonderful panel for nearly five years.

Here trying to find answers to what happened to my screen. Panel has a couple vertical bars on two of the columns. Trying to determine if the panel suddenly went bad or if it's a t-con issue. I can't seem to find a comparable issue with two weeks of Google searches. LOL! I think I should have started here at Badcaps. Glad I came across this site!
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Old 09-16-2017, 01:37 PM   #663
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welcome.
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Old 09-18-2017, 02:47 PM   #664
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http://gadgets.ndtv.com/huawei-m865-64

I still have the phone, its unstable at full voltage/stock clock now and the battery is dead.... Along with the network it ran on......
Lol, so you overclocked your phone???
Why in the world would anyone do that?!

Modern phones already have a pretty crappy battery life and almost as much processing power as some 10-year old computers. It doesn't make sense to push them further.

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Testing SIMMs/DIMMs (even PCI cards) in a surplus commercial machine is foolhardy. Most sockets (e.g., DIMM sockets) are rated for a very low number of insertion cycles -- like 5 to 25! If it's a consumer class machine, figure on the lower of those limits.
Doesn't matter. The PC I set up was already headed for the recycling bin, where it would likely get crushed for valuable metals. So not that much of a big loss if I messed up the slots on the motherboard. That said, I've tested over 30 pairs of RAM modules on it, and they all passed.

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But, you also might find yourself with "dubious test results" that you can't reliably (and repeatably) attribute to the DUT -- or the test rig itself.
I can, because I had a few RAM modules that I tested extensively many times and they always passed. I kept them for this exact reason - if this machine started misbehaving, I could always verify if it was the slots or not. Never got to doing that, though, because the computer ended up getting recycled shortly after I left that job. It served me well while I was there, though.

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Old 09-18-2017, 05:36 PM   #665
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Lol, so you overclocked your phone???
Why in the world would anyone do that?!

Modern phones already have a pretty crappy battery life and almost as much processing power as some 10-year old computers. It doesn't make sense to push them further.
Modern it is not. It's 10 years old, runs Android 2.2. At the time low-mid range Android phones like this were single core ARM v5. AKA, slower than shit and no acceleration. To put battery life in perspective, the battery is only a couple hundred mAh smaller than my current phone.

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Old 09-18-2017, 07:33 PM   #666
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Ah okay, shows how much I know about phones.

Still... overclocking any kind of mobile device seems a bit crazy to me. The manufacturer probably had the CPU running at some frequency that was already producing marginally-dangerous temperatures on the core. So pushing it further probably did not help. And you drain your battery faster.

No acceleration? F**k it, it's a phone - it's meant for calling! (Wait, does anyone even do that anymore, lol?)
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Old 09-19-2017, 09:02 AM   #667
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Someone was throwing out a Samsung 40" 2011 Series 6 Smart TV UN40D6000 that would turn on for 1 second then loose power and shut off, an easy fix that I was going to do myself but I contacted Samsung support and told them my model TV was was turning on then off and the support guy said it was a manufacturing fault on that model and they will repair it for free, so I took it to my local Samsung authorized repairer to take care of it and a few weeks later they called me and said Samsung told them the part is no longer available and offered me a brand new Samsung 43" 2017 Series 6 UHD 4K TV MU6100 as a free replacement!! Not bad for free!
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Old 09-19-2017, 03:40 PM   #668
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Haha wow, and who said you can't polish a turd?
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Old 09-19-2017, 08:31 PM   #669
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i did that with about 6 sony monitors once - a company threw them out without realising they had a 3 year warranty from the date on the back!
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Old 09-19-2017, 11:24 PM   #670
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Doesn't matter. The PC I set up was already headed for the recycling bin, where it would likely get crushed for valuable metals. So not that much of a big loss if I messed up the slots on the motherboard. That said, I've tested over 30 pairs of RAM modules on it, and they all passed
I "process" >30 machines in a single day! Attached are some photos of the "giveaways" headed out the door. The photos are ~10 years old, which explains the "vintage" of the machines. Typically, they are retired (given away) after 1.5 - 3 years. E.g., we're retiring i5's and i7's, now.

The initial obvious approach of setting up dedicated machines to test disks, memory, monitors, etc. quickly showed the flaw in relying on "consumer kit" for test fixtures (i.e., the "test fixtures" couldn't stand up to the sort of use -- connectors and cables -- to which they were subjected).

Instead, stuff components that you hope to be operational into a machine and test the machine as a "finished assembly" (since each cable/connector will eventually need to be mated prior to final assembly, mate them exactly once!). If something fails, toss it in the scrap pile and move on to the next subassembly/component.
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Old 09-21-2017, 11:26 AM   #671
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Instead, stuff components that you hope to be operational into a machine and test the machine as a "finished assembly" (since each cable/connector will eventually need to be mated prior to final assembly, mate them exactly once!).
That's what I did most of the time. My "dedicated" RAM/HDD/PSU test rigs were not meant for testing every single system component that passed through the shop, but only the occasional component that I couldn't verify in any other PC/system. Otherwise, yeah, I see what you are saying now - you thought I was taking the RAM out of every system and testing it into that test PC. - Ha, no way I'd do that. Takes too much time and we had way too many systems per day. Indeed the connectors won't stand a chance with that kind of "traffic" through them.
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Old 09-22-2017, 09:28 AM   #672
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That's what I did most of the time. My "dedicated" RAM/HDD/PSU test rigs were not meant for testing every single system component that passed through the shop, but only the occasional component that I couldn't verify in any other PC/system. Otherwise, yeah, I see what you are saying now - you thought I was taking the RAM out of every system and testing it into that test PC. - Ha, no way I'd do that. Takes too much time and we had way too many systems per day. Indeed the connectors won't stand a chance with that kind of "traffic" through them.
We were looking for a way of testing "pulls" -- to decide what to hang onto (i.e., use to build future machines) vs. discard now (known to be defective).

Machines appear in batches of 100 - 2,000 (I'm looking at 3 pallets of Optiplex 990's, presently -- about 500 machines). We want to isolate those units that are worth restoring by quickly discarding those that are "less desirable": machines that have seen physical abuse; may be odd/one-of-a-kind (not worth the effort to build just one-off); machines that will require a bit of work to make cosmetically presentable (e.g., folks who like putting decorative stickers on their workstations).

So, we quickly triage the machines in a lot and pull off the known discards.

But, all will typically have some components that are easy to salvage, with little effort: disks, RAM, batteries (discard as hazardous waste), drive sleds, certain cables, etc.

But, you have no way of knowing if those components are operational -- without testing them! It's silly to find space to store defective parts!

We regularly use "spare" machines as test fixtures for other things (e.g., monitor test/burn-in, disk imaging, etc. So, why not for RAM testing?

This seemed like a straight-forward approach: let a flunky spend his time loading RAM SIMM/DIMMs into slots for sizing and testing. Discard all failing units and label the "likely good" units (so we can have a consistent label on all memory modules instead of having to figure out how each manufacturer chose to label each particular memory module).

This approach works well for the test stations that are used for disks -- because we can easily discard/replace the cabling that connects the disks-under-test" to the tester, thereby not "wearing out" the test fixture. But, there's no go-between for the memory: the SIMM/DIMM sockets are part of the motherboard so you have to replace the motherboard when the sockets start to be unreliable.

So, we now keep RAM pulls in large tubs, crudely sorted by speed (based on physical dimensions of the module, location of key, etc.); bare disks stacked on shelves, roughly sorted by capacity; etc. Using any of these components becomes a crap-shoot: install in the system you're building, test the system as a whole, discard anything that looks suspect and replace with something "new".

I wrote an application that tabulates notable parts of each machine ("does it have serial ports? how many video interfaces? NICs? how much RAM? etc."), exercises them and tracks the results in a database. This is PXE-booted (so, no media to handle/misplace/worry about version number, etc.) and the "system" automatically has a unique identifier for each machine tested: its MAC!

So, while a single machine may take hours to "process" completely -- it will only take minutes of a person's time to tether it to the test system (via network cable). And, as each machine only needs a "user interface" for the few minutes it takes to configure its BIOS to PXE boot, I can have one keyboard/mouse/monitor that moves from machine to machine instead of having to attach a monitor, mouse and keyboard to each machine (and leave them sitting there, throwing off heat while each machine runs the test application).

When it comes time to build a machine, the "system" can serve up images (from the database) that the "application" simply copies onto each machine's hard disk (either immediately after testing or at a later date). Slap a label on the machine (so you don't have to power it on at a later date to figure out its status, OS, driver versions, etc.) So, I only have to build one image for an "Optiplex 990" to handle those ~500 machines!

But, the effort (of developing the application and the "system") only makes sense when you have dozens/hundreds of machines to process -- and many identical configurations. Folks having to deal with "one of these and three of those" would find the effort to be overkill.
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Old 09-22-2017, 09:13 PM   #673
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I "process" >30 machines in a single day! Attached are some photos of the "giveaways" headed out the door. The photos are ~10 years old, which explains the "vintage" of the machines. Typically, they are retired (given away) after 1.5 - 3 years. E.g., we're retiring i5's and i7's, now.

The initial obvious approach of setting up dedicated machines to test disks, memory, monitors, etc. quickly showed the flaw in relying on "consumer kit" for test fixtures (i.e., the "test fixtures" couldn't stand up to the sort of use -- connectors and cables -- to which they were subjected).

Instead, stuff components that you hope to be operational into a machine and test the machine as a "finished assembly" (since each cable/connector will eventually need to be mated prior to final assembly, mate them exactly once!). If something fails, toss it in the scrap pile and move on to the next subassembly/component.
Say what?

I'd want some of that.

Aren't i5 and i7 machines still pretty capable for work or home use?
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Old 09-23-2017, 12:04 PM   #674
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But, the effort (of developing the application and the "system") only makes sense when you have dozens/hundreds of machines to process -- and many identical configurations. Folks having to deal with "one of these and three of those" would find the effort to be overkill.
Well, that's exactly the difference between the place where you work and where I worked - we were dealing with individual customers' computers. Thus, no way we could rip all the components out of every computer and dump it on a shelf, then use whatever is convenient later - most customers expect to get their computers back the way they were before, unless of course, a component needed to be changed to fix the machine.

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Say what?

I'd want some of that.

Aren't i5 and i7 machines still pretty capable for work or home use?
They are. Heck, even the "old" Core 2 Duo/Quad CPUs are plenty for regular home/office use.

But in the eyes of upper management (particularly in big organizations and governments), newer is always better. So they swap equipment every 2-4 years, even if it doesn't make sense. From a financial planning standpoint, however, it does make sense: you know exactly how much funds will need to be raised per year to meet that goal. It also gives the IT dept. a steady workflow. Otherwise, they'd barely have anything to do (i.e., this swapping allows them to justify their paycheck.)

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Old 09-23-2017, 01:06 PM   #675
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<sarcasm>
no they're not capable for home use, they don't fit in pocket...
</sarcasm>
or
<sarcasm>
my employer is so cheap they cant afford to upgrade this old core2duo with windows xp...
</sarcasm>

I need to replace my old Core2 Duo for cheap, it's board is dying, too many bad caps on it else it works perfectly for my uses... :-(
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Old 09-23-2017, 03:46 PM   #676
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Aren't i5 and i7 machines still pretty capable for work or home use?
IMnsHO, even machines older than i5's are "capable for work or home use". People seem to over-buy hardware and then burden it with poor (or poorly configured) software. Regardless, most machines are still faster than the user actually needs (excepting gamers, etc.)

I just (last night) retired a Dell XPS 600 (2.8GHz dual core w/8G and 1T spinning rust) that I'd been using for 3D CAD, modeling, etc. Yeah, I can render some of my models faster with newer iron but I can also WORK SMARTER and not need to render as often! In that case, my personal meatware is the limiting factor!

I write most of my software and formal (i.e., camera ready) documentation on far slower machines -- including laptops (e.g., I use an HP 8730w when away from the office).

Even rendering 3D animations (brutal on CPU) doesn't really require lots of muscle; just plan on letting a machine work on it while you're busy doing something else!

But, employers have IT-droids convincing them that they need to "clean house" every 18-36 months and upgrade everything. So, lots of kit ends up headed for the tip that could otherwise see continued use.

Rescued a Dell 3007wfp recently because it wasn't worth some IT guy's time to sort out how to make it work on <whatever-OS> (noting, of course, that said IT guy probably was instrumental in getting employer to move to <whatever-OS>!)

<http://www.ubergizmo.com/reviews/dell-3007wfp-30-inch-lcd-monitor-review/>
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Old 09-23-2017, 04:04 PM   #677
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Well, that's exactly the difference between the place where you work and where I worked - we were dealing with individual customers' computers. Thus, no way we could rip all the components out of every computer and dump it on a shelf, then use whatever is convenient later - most customers expect to get their computers back the way they were before, unless of course, a component needed to be changed to fix the machine.
Ours is a hybrid situation. Machines are sourced by companies donating them (in large numbers) as they, typically, do their periodic upgrades. E.g., we've had 18-wheelers show up packed with kit gathered from "regional offices" around the country. We sort the units and repair/refurbish as required. We then distribute them to individuals -- who "expect to get their computers back the way they were before". Usually, because they have no skills (or other resources) on which to draw to maintain the machines.

As we are "sourcing" the computers to those clients, having their configurations/images available on the server means we can restore to "as delivered" condition with a couple of mouse clicks. Clients are encouraged to keep personal files separate from the OS/applications as we make only a modest effort to restore the stuff they've added after delivery (and NO effort to reinstall any applications they may have added).

So, a "repair" involves imaging the system disk "as received". Restoring the original "as delivered" image to see if that fixes their problem (most "problems" are software related). Fix any hardware that (rarely) has failed (no guarantee that you'll get the same make/model components -- or even PC! -- returned to you!). Then, grep the "as received" image for any obvious personal additions and try to put them back where they were.

To be clear, we're not an IT department. The kit and the "repairs" are essentially "no charge" so the onus is on the recipient to minimize their personal exposure to loss!

If we see you too often, we start increasing the time it takes for you to have your machine returned to you -- until you learn not to be such a drain on our resources! As I (nor any of the other folks involved) am not paid for my time, I can put whatever conditions I want on the services that I donate, when I donate them, etc. No "boss" controlling my time/effort.

Piss me off and I'll innocently smile -- as I stiff you! ("Gee, I'm sorry I wasn't able to recover all those photographs you said were stored on the machine. The disk was damaged -- so I just replaced it...")

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Old 09-23-2017, 04:49 PM   #678
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They are. Heck, even the "old" Core 2 Duo/Quad CPUs are plenty for regular home/office use.

But in the eyes of upper management (particularly in big organizations and governments), newer is always better. So they swap equipment every 2-4 years, even if it doesn't make sense. From a financial planning standpoint, however, it does make sense: you know exactly how much funds will need to be raised per year to meet that goal. It also gives the IT dept. a steady workflow. Otherwise, they'd barely have anything to do (i.e., this swapping allows them to justify their paycheck.)
In many cases there is good reason for "short" replacement cycles in the corporate world:
-Many companies have a crap ton of security/monitoring/remote management software that always runs in the background and bogs down the system requiring more powerful hardware than for a normal home user to run the same applications, for example my work laptop uses over 3GB of ram and around 30% CPU (I5-5300U) just sitting on the desktop with no programs running with all the crap they have running in the background.
-Most corporate desktops run 24/7 and laptops run at least 8hrs. a day 5 days a week and often more (many companies want PC always on and connected to the network so the can receive updates) and are often handled carelessly, this combined with the normal affect of age means that after a few years reliability drops significantly and the downtime/loss of productivity caused by broken equipment often costs more than the savings of keeping it longer (particularly in large companies when only a few percent increase in failures means hundreds or thousands of more people who can't do their work due to broken PCs).
-There are the tax implications of depreciating assets (in this case IT equipment) over a certain period of time depending on the industry and applicable state/federal taxes. If the tax code says they can deprecate equipment to 0 over X years and write off the value it often makes sense to replace that equipment when that interval hits rather than keeping it and loosing the tax savings.
-Power savings of newer equipment may also be a major factor (especially when it comes to data centers), while say a 25-50% reduction in power draw might not mean much to a home user where it only means a few dollars (or possibly cents depending on electricity rates and amount of usage) on their monthly power bill, but to a major company with thousands of computers (which as noted often run 24/7) this can equal thousands or tens of thousands of dollars a month.

All these factors together often justify the intervals used, but means that a lot of useable equipment ends up on the secondary market which is great for people that want cheap PCs and don't care about having the "latest and greatest" (not to mention that even a few years old corporate grade PC is often more reliable than much of the newer "consumer grade" crap).

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Old 09-23-2017, 05:30 PM   #679
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In many cases there is good reason for "short" replacement cycles in the corporate world:
<snip>

- Many (most?) IT departments don't have much technical "depth". Many of the staff are effectively trained as "Windows supporters" and not "real" IT. Show them something that doesn't have an x86 inside -- or run Windows -- and they're at a complete loss. The few souls who may have the necessary technical depth to make informed decisions/implementations often aren't the ones who have the "ears" of management.

- The "No-one-ever-got-fired-for-buying-IBM" effect; it's safer to just keep moving forward with "the latest and greatest" (and blame any problems that your organization encounters on the provider(s)) than it is to take a deliberate "stand" and cling to a technology that "has been working well for us" (exposing yourself to a potential future problem which is then "blamed" on your decision NOT to upgrade).

- It's not YOUR money! So, why NOT upgrade all this kit? If the peripherals are no longer supported (drivers), replace them, as well! I've yet to see a business lump all IT needs into a single budget (i.e., money spent on equipment comes at the expense of hiring additional staff, etc.)

- Out-facing interfaces. I.e., if your key suppliers/customers have "moved forward", there is pressure on you to do likewise ("Gee, we can't read your OLD MSWord2010 documents; why don't you upgrade that software?" -- which usually means OS and hardware upgrades)

- Sheer ignorance. People THINK they need something without actually knowing their options. And, not having the skillsets to evaluate those options, they rely on folks who APPEAR to "know what they're talking about" for guidance (comfortable that they've abrogated responsibility for their decision to someone else!)

- Pop culture. All the cliche advice you see/hear in the media telling you what you "need" (e.g., antivirus software, automatic update services for your OS and apps, etc.). See above.

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Originally Posted by dmill89 View Post
All these factors together often justify the intervals used, but means that a lot of usable equipment ends up on the secondary market which is great for people that want cheap PCs and don't care about having the "latest and greatest" (not to mention that even a few years old corporate grade PC is often more reliable than much of the newer "consumer grade" crap).
Having dropped enough money into "computer stuff" over the past 40 years to buy a house, I've come to realize that "new" just means "yet another need to upgrade applications, reconfigure/relearn, etc.". As every DOLLAR spent comes out of MY pocket -- along with every HOUR -- I think really hard before upgrading (hardware OR software).

For most consumers, an "appliance" that lets them send mail and browse the web is probably more than they'll ever need! <frown> But, no one wants to "brag" about having JUST that!
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Old 09-25-2017, 03:22 PM   #680
grss1982
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Default Re: Your Best Dumpster Finds

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Originally Posted by momaka View Post
Well, that's exactly the difference between the place where you work and where I worked - we were dealing with individual customers' computers. Thus, no way we could rip all the components out of every computer and dump it on a shelf, then use whatever is convenient later - most customers expect to get their computers back the way they were before, unless of course, a component needed to be changed to fix the machine.


They are. Heck, even the "old" Core 2 Duo/Quad CPUs are plenty for regular home/office use.

But in the eyes of upper management (particularly in big organizations and governments), newer is always better. So they swap equipment every 2-4 years, even if it doesn't make sense. From a financial planning standpoint, however, it does make sense: you know exactly how much funds will need to be raised per year to meet that goal. It also gives the IT dept. a steady workflow. Otherwise, they'd barely have anything to do (i.e., this swapping allows them to justify their paycheck.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmill89 View Post
In many cases there is good reason for "short" replacement cycles in the corporate world:
-Many companies have a crap ton of security/monitoring/remote management software that always runs in the background and bogs down the system requiring more powerful hardware than for a normal home user to run the same applications, for example my work laptop uses over 3GB of ram and around 30% CPU (I5-5300U) just sitting on the desktop with no programs running with all the crap they have running in the background.
-Most corporate desktops run 24/7 and laptops run at least 8hrs. a day 5 days a week and often more (many companies want PC always on and connected to the network so the can receive updates) and are often handled carelessly, this combined with the normal affect of age means that after a few years reliability drops significantly and the downtime/loss of productivity caused by broken equipment often costs more than the savings of keeping it longer (particularly in large companies when only a few percent increase in failures means hundreds or thousands of more people who can't do their work due to broken PCs).
-There are the tax implications of depreciating assets (in this case IT equipment) over a certain period of time depending on the industry and applicable state/federal taxes. If the tax code says they can deprecate equipment to 0 over X years and write off the value it often makes sense to replace that equipment when that interval hits rather than keeping it and loosing the tax savings.
-Power savings of newer equipment may also be a major factor (especially when it comes to data centers), while say a 25-50% reduction in power draw might not mean much to a home user where it only means a few dollars (or possibly cents depending on electricity rates and amount of usage) on their monthly power bill, but to a major company with thousands of computers (which as noted often run 24/7) this can equal thousands or tens of thousands of dollars a month.

All these factors together often justify the intervals used, but means that a lot of useable equipment ends up on the secondary market which is great for people that want cheap PCs and don't care about having the "latest and greatest" (not to mention that even a few years old corporate grade PC is often more reliable than much of the newer "consumer grade" crap).
Thanks for the info dump. Very informative.

I've been in the BPO sector for 8 years now. Not with I.T. mind you but just a humble agent for one of our clients and it has always bothered me that when I started with the company, we jumped from C2D-based Dells to S1156 i5-based Dells to S1155-based HPs and to the current S1150-based Dells. Next thing I know were going to be on Kabylake or Coffeelake CPUs. :P

The programs we use rarely change but our hardware gets upgraded in a short amount of time.

Too bad though that in my country the people who bid for the company's "old stuff" that gets disposed resell these in the secondary market at near brand new prices or even higher.

Last edited by grss1982; 09-25-2017 at 03:27 PM..
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