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Old 07-10-2020, 07:25 AM   #3101
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Default Re: Power supply build quality pictorial. part 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by RukyCon View Post
Some notes i forgot to add to the main post due to time restrictions: The main control IC is a TL494L PWM controller with a TP3510 supervisor IC.
All of the wires are 20AWG, with an exception for the PS-ON wire which is 22AWG.
the two smaller transformers are roughly 30mm tall by 20mm wide.
Based off the date codes on components, this thing was made around early 2011.
I'm not a power supply expert, so i'm unsure what the full capability of this thing is, i will say however that the primary caps seem a bit undersized for 350w.
Anyways that's that and sorry for double posting.
The worst thing here is the output rectifier for 12V rail.

I mean, this thing was made in 2010, 10 years after the Pentium 4 cpus that were the first cpus drawing power from 12V rail.

It should be power heavy on 12V and light on the other rails, not the other way.

But the good news is that you could replace the part with a proper 30A schottky diode with V reverse of 60V or more
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Old 07-10-2020, 11:27 AM   #3102
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Default Re: ISO Model: ISO-400 350w PSU

Quote:
Originally Posted by RukyCon View Post
Hello, I've been wanting to show this PSU for a while, but have not due to a mix of laziness and fear that i would once again make a fool of myself.
Laziness/procrastination, I can understand.
But making a fool of yourself? I mean, you're just posting about a PSU. Have no worries!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RukyCon View Post
The main transformer's size is 36.5mm wide by 45mm tall (i'm guessing this makes it an ERL36).
Should be 35, as the sizes are more or less standard (28, 33, 35, 40, and etc.) Not that this is the only important parameter. Height matters as well. You can have a supposedly ERL35 traffo. But if it's very short, that means less core material and less space for windings as well, which can translate to a hotter-running traffo.

But the one in this ISO looks normal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RukyCon View Post
Now i'm not sure how capable this is for 350w of power
With the size of those primary caps and output toroid... eh, probably not. With 470 uF, 200V input caps, I'd say the limit is closer to 250-300 Watts tops. The output toroid seems kind of small too, so it probably won't allow for more either. If these two were bigger, the 13009 BJTs on the primary should allow it to do 350 Watts continuous and maybe 400W peak for short periods of time (under a minute.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by RukyCon View Post
the Gun primary caps immediately reminded me of my Winsa PSU, which i suspected at the time was possibly OEMed by CWT (like this PSU), but didn't think CWT would lower their standards to such a level to make such a thing.
Yeah, that Winsa PSU kind of tries to look like a CWT with those green transformers. However, the PCB layout is not something I have seen come out of CWT. So hard to say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RukyCon View Post
I hope this post is any good
Yessir!
Thanks for sharing your PSU pics with us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Behemot View Post


don't think CWT has anything to do with this PoS, likely some fake copy if anything

they make CM6800 based PSUs as the cheapest for way more than a decade now
Nah, Rukycon is correct - this is indeed a CWT PSU. It's just an extremely old platform from the early 2000's, known as the "ISO" line. The TL494 and TPS3510 ICs on the secondary side and the way they are arranged is one of the giveaways. The "Lineplay Pass" sticker on the primary caps is another one. I see that the Winsa PSU has that sticker as well. On a second look, that may be a CWT PSU as well.

Indeed hard to imagine why CWT would make such crap, but you never know. CWT still churns out some cheapo PSUs, so maybe this was an updated replacement for the ISO budget line? Or perhaps an even more stripped down budget PSU meant for 3rd world countries only??

With the large-scale manufacturing of today, though, it's still mind-boggling to try to understand why such POS PSUs are still made.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Behemot View Post


don't think CWT has anything to do with this PoS, likely some fake copy if anything

they make CM6800 based PSUs as the cheapest for way more than a decade now
Nah, Rukycon is correct - this is indeed a CWT PSU. It's just an extremely old platform from the early 2000's, known as the "ISO" line. The TL494 and TPS3510 ICs on the secondary side and the way they are arranged is one of the giveaways. The "Lineplay Pass" sticker on the primary caps is another one. I see that the Winsa PSU has that sticker as well. On a second look, that may be a CWT PSU as well.

Indeed hard to imagine why CWT would make such crap, but you never know. CWT still churns out some cheapo PSUs, so maybe this was an updated replacement for the ISO budget line? Or perhaps an even more stripped down budget PSU meant for 3rd world countries only??

With the large-scale manufacturing of today, though, it's still mind-boggling to try to understand why such POS PSUs are still made.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goodpsusearch View Post
Protection? No, we don't have this here

I have noticed several times Linkworld psus with bulging caps and 12V rail going up to even 14V and the psu still working

This is the thing I don't like at all at Linkworld power supplies. But, maybe this is common in many cheap psus, can't tell for sure.
Well, under and over-voltage protections seem to always have been problematic for cheapo PSUs, especially ones based on half-bridge. But I remember reading some bargain basement PSU reviews a while back, and Linkworld PSUs - at least those with their own proprietary ICs - were among the few that would shut down when overloaded (OPP, likely?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by goodpsusearch View Post
But the good news is that you could replace the part with a proper 30A schottky diode with V reverse of 60V or more
Yup.
But question after that is what will burn next if you try to pull that kind of power? The output toroid and 12V rail snubber already look like they were barely making it by the skin of their teeth. I don't imagine they could take much more.

Last edited by momaka; 07-10-2020 at 11:31 AM..
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Old 07-13-2020, 02:41 AM   #3103
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Default Re: ISO Model: ISO-400 350w PSU

Quote:
Originally Posted by momaka View Post
Laziness/procrastination, I can understand.
But making a fool of yourself? I mean, you're just posting about a PSU. Have no worries!
I tend to make super obvious mistakes if i'm left here for too long, something that a lot of people here must have seen first hand at some point, i try my best for it not to happen, but it still happens a lot.


Quote:
Originally Posted by momaka View Post
Should be 35, as the sizes are more or less standard (28, 33, 35, 40, and etc.) Not that this is the only important parameter. Height matters as well. You can have a supposedly ERL35 traffo. But if it's very short, that means less core material and less space for windings as well, which can translate to a hotter-running traffo.

But the one in this ISO looks normal.
I wasn't too familiar with the transformer sizing and the different sizes, so i didn't know if ERL36 was a size.


Quote:
Originally Posted by momaka View Post
With the size of those primary caps and output toroid... eh, probably not. With 470 uF, 200V input caps, I'd say the limit is closer to 250-300 Watts tops. The output toroid seems kind of small too, so it probably won't allow for more either. If these two were bigger, the 13009 BJTs on the primary should allow it to do 350 Watts continuous and maybe 400W peak for short periods of time (under a minute.)
I could at the very least put bigger caps on the primary side to improve hold up time, but thats assuming i have a use for it, which at the moment, i do not.
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Old 10-11-2020, 02:26 PM   #3104
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Default Jewel JS-12030-2E power adapter, take TWO

Remember this Jewel JS-12030-2E power adapter??

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wester547 View Post
That CapXon KF may test okay for now but who knows how long it’s going to last, especially since it’s 12 years old now going by the datecode. CrapXon are still replace-on-sight for me, always have been and always will be.
Proper foreshadowing there!

After maybe about 1 year of occasional use, I plugged this power adapter one day and heard a sizzling / hissing noise and misty smoke pour out of it. I hadn't closed the case, of course, so taking it apart was as simple as pulling the top cover off… which revealed this:
https://www.badcaps.net/forum/attach...1&d=1602447954


Mmmmm… freshly-bulged/leaked CapXon KF. What a delightful smell!
You can also see droplets of electrolyte on the top shell in the upper-left corner – again, courtesy of that CapXon KF, 16V, 1000 uF cap on the output.

I desoldered the CapXon KF cap and did a few checks on the power adapter to make sure nothing else went bad. Everything checked out okay, so I gave it a more proper recap this time:


Basically, I moved the Elite EB, 16V, 1000 uF cap on the spot after the PI coil (where the freshly-bulged CapXon KF was just sitting) and installed a new Rubycon YXJ, 16V, 1000 uF cap in the spot before the PI coil. While at it, I also changed the startup cap (50V, 22 uF) with a Nichicon PW (or PM or PS - I can’t remember which) that I now had in stock.

After this, I plugged the adapter in and checked it with and without a load once again. Output voltage was good in both cases, so we’re back in business with this one.

The only CapXon cap left now is the primary input one. But I don’t have any 400V caps in stock in that size, so it’s going to have to wait. As such, I won’t bother with gluing / sealing the top cover again, because I have a hunch even that input CapXon KM cap will fail, despite primary-connected caps usually not failing that often - at least on SMPS without APFC. But this is CapXon, after all, so one can never know.

Anyone wanna hazard a guess when I’ll be posting back about this adapter once again to report the primary CapXon cap failing? Feel free to cue your votes below.

Oh, and what’s very ironic is I used this adapter quite often with my ESR / bad cap meter. So my cap meter’s power adapter had a bad cap. Imagine that.
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Old 10-11-2020, 03:48 PM   #3105
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Default Re: Power supply build quality pictorial. part 2

I give it roughly 6 months before the main filter expires. I'm also going to guess that when it does, it's going to fail shorted before you can unplug it and trip a breaker or blow a fuse, and it might take out the bridge rectifier in the process.
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Old 10-16-2020, 07:47 PM   #3106
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Talking TRUMPower FSP300-60LG [P/N: TIPC-300FLX-UT]

With presidential elections right around the corner, today’s PSU post is going to be themed around that. More specifically, if our current president (Mr. Trump) could name his own brand of ATX power supplies, what do you think he’d choose?
.
.
If you guessed TRUMPower, you’d be right. GO MURICA!!!


No, that label is not a photoshop joke. This is a real legit power supply. And if the FSP300-LG in the model number is to hint at something, it’s that it is made by FSP. Moreover, those two specific stickers below the label (“Ball Bearing Fan” and “Active PFC”) are another tell-tale that this is an FSP/Sparkle unit, in case anyone didn’t look up the UL number already (E190414).

As for the PSU itself, this is it:


It’s one of those small (ITX?) form factor PSUs. It came from a mini server blade/computer from my previous job. There was just no way to check the PSU at the time and place where the server was, and we were swapping parts desperately to get up the server running as quick as possible again. So to eliminate as many components as possible from being troublesome again, the PSU was swapped on the spot. No one wanted to do anything with the old PSU (the one pictured here), so it was destined for recycling… until I intercepted.

As you can see, there isn’t much to the TRUMPower FPS300-60LG it in terms of cabling: only a 20-pin ATX connector, 4-pin 12V CPU power connector, a single Molex, and a floppy/berg - all 20-AWG size wires too, except the three 3.3V wires on the main 20-pin ATX connector (those are 18-AWG.) That’s it! Not sure why a 300 Watt PSU would have so few connections, but I suspect it was a custom order from FSP specifically designed for the blades we were using, because those are all of the connections they really need.

Moving onto the insides of the PSU… I can’t really show pictures of the primary and the secondary separately, like I usually do. It’s just way too cramped in there. Have a look:




This PSU is almost like a laptop power adapter, except a little more powerful (rated for 300 Watts.) I’m not sure at what temperature that is, though. A slightly older FSP from the older blades we had at work, was pretty much the same identical unit as this one (though, with more output connectors), yet only rated at 270 Watts (@ 40C) / 300W @ 25C ambient operation. So I can probably assume the same applies for this TRUMPower unit as well.

In any case, the power per unit volume of this PSU is still pretty amazing. Moreover, the PSU does actually work fine - I tested it eventually. That shouldn’t be too surprising, though, given the good quality components inside. In fact, note that all of the capacitors are Japanese brands (mostly United Chemicon and Rubycon from what I see.) Even the primary cap is Japanese (United Chemicon KMR), which is good to see in a PSU with APFC. And to show that FSP isn’t joking, they used a 450V -rated cap here.

On that note, in order to get this kind of high power output with good efficiency, the TRUMPower PSU uses a monorail output design - i.e. main PS produces only a 12V DC output (through two 60 Amp Schottky rectifiers?) The 3.3V and 5V rails are generated each by its own buck converter from the 12V rail. Both the 3.3V and 5V rails use polymer caps for their filters (Fujitsu FPCAP, IIRC.)

And that more or less sums it up about this PSU. Everything that needs to be there is there. See below for a slightly more detailed parts list.

Input EMI/RFI filter: two X2-class caps, four Y2-class caps, two CM chokes
Input Protection: 8 Amp or 10 Amp fuse; SCK 1R55 NTC thermistor; 1x MOV
Input wiring: 20-AWG, 300V
APFC: 1x 11N60NT(?) MOSFET + 1x STTH8R06FP diode
Input cap: Nippon Chemicon KMR series, 450V, 270 uF, 30x22 mm (dia. x h.)
Main PS: 2x FCPF 11N60 MOSFETs (2-transistor forward design), driven by a CM6800(?) IC
ICs: TNY260PN (5VSB), CM6800 (APFC + main PS), APW7159 (3.3V & 5V buck driver IC), and not sure about protection IC, because I can’t see where it is buried in there.
Transformers: 29 mm core for main PS and 19 mm core for 5VSB
Cooling fan: Protechnic Electric 40 x 40 x 15 mm
Output Rectifiers: two 60A60 (in parallel??) for the 12V rail, can't read info on anything else, though.

Output caps:
1x Rubycon ZLH, 16V, 2200 uF, 10 mm dia. (for 5VSB?)
2x Rubycon ZLH, 16V, 1000 uF, 8 mm dia. (for 12V rail?)
1x United Chemicon KY, 16V, 1000 uF, 8 mm dia. (for??)
1x United Chemicon KZH, 10V, 1000 uF, 8 mm dia. (for 5VSB?)
1x UCC PSF polymer, 16V, 470 uF, 8 mm dia. + 3x other polies (can’t read info, but they look like Fujitsu FPCAPs??)

And that’s all Mr. Trump packed in this one.
Now if only our current politics looked this clean and tidy as this PSU…

Last edited by momaka; 10-16-2020 at 07:51 PM..
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Old 10-17-2020, 12:50 PM   #3107
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Default Re: Power supply build quality pictorial. part 2

Looking at that form factor, I think it's TFX as I might have a similar 250W unit (except it actually says FSP on it.) out of a NEC unit that had a burnt mobo.
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