Badcaps.net Forum
Go Back   Badcaps Forums > General Topics > General Computer & Tech Discussion
Register FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-23-2012, 08:18 PM   #41
Topcat
The Boss Stooge
 
Topcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
City & State: Salem, MO
My Country: United States
Line Voltage: 240V @ 60Hz
I'm a: Professional Tech
Posts: 12,641
Default Re: Firefox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

^
Wow, the most I think i've ever seen it use was like 700mb....and that was with a buttload of tabs going on multiple windows....
__________________
<--- Badcaps.net Founder & Owner

Badcaps.net Services:

Premade Capacitor Kits
Badcaps.net Capacitor Master List


Motherboard Repair Services


If you've come here in search of replacement capacitors or repair services, please use the links above.
----------------------------------------------
Badcaps.net Forum Members Folding Team
http://folding.stanford.edu/
Team : 49813
Join in!!
Team Stats
Topcat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2012, 09:19 PM   #42
Scenic
o.O
 
Scenic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
City & State: Duisburg
My Country: Germany
Line Voltage: 230VAC 50Hz
Posts: 2,614
Default Re: Firefox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

I ran into the 2GB 32Bit limitation on a regular basis till I found Waterfox (basically a 64bit ffx)

Old screenshot..

edit: a bit hard to click on the attachment.. so I [img]'d it

Attached Images
File Type: jpg ffx.jpg (10.2 KB, 327 views)

Last edited by Scenic; 05-23-2012 at 09:24 PM..
Scenic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2012, 09:26 PM   #43
Topcat
The Boss Stooge
 
Topcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
City & State: Salem, MO
My Country: United States
Line Voltage: 240V @ 60Hz
I'm a: Professional Tech
Posts: 12,641
Default Re: Firefox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

^
Waterfox doesn't support XP64....I tried it.
Topcat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2012, 09:41 PM   #44
Scenic
o.O
 
Scenic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
City & State: Duisburg
My Country: Germany
Line Voltage: 230VAC 50Hz
Posts: 2,614
Default Re: Firefox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

I guess the only option would be firefox nightly builds then..(?!)

No idea if those work on XP64 though..

example (no installer)
ftp://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/firefox/ni...n64-x86_64.zip
Scenic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2012, 12:47 PM   #45
walking
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
City & State: sacramento,ca
My Country: usa
I'm a: Knowledge Seeker
Posts: 23
Default Re: Firefox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

Hmm, Nice.

Pages load like greased lightning now.

I notice there is like a 250 millisec delay then BANG the entire page is there.

My dsl is 1.26 and .38 up and loading is waaaay faster now.
walking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 07:34 AM   #46
faisal1046
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
City & State: kot addu
My Country: paksitan
I'm a: Knowledge Seeker
Posts: 2
Default Re: Firefox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

Thanks...
faisal1046 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2012, 04:25 PM   #47
RJARRRPCGP
Badcaps Veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
City & State: North Springfield, Vermont
My Country: USA
Line Voltage: 118-127V 59-63.5 Hz-> actualizar: pérdido de voltaje
I'm a: Knowledge Seeker
Posts: 4,803
Default Re: Firefox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by walking View Post
Hmm, Nice.

Pages load like greased lightning now.

I notice there is like a 250 millisec delay then BANG the entire page is there.
You can take out that stupid delay. Don't need any dial-up-like 250ms bull.

In fact, I could ping less than 250 ms when I had 56K.
__________________
Asus P6T6 WS Revolution

Core i7 Extreme "Bloomfield" 965

Asus Strix GeForce GTX 970

Windows 7 SP1

SoundBlaster ZXR

Corsair TX850M PSU

Looks like I have a laptop that kills a desktop PC!

Received on November 4, 2019:
MSI GF63 Thin 9SC-649US


"There's nothing more unattractive than a chick smoking a cigarette" -Topcat

"Don't eat yellow snow!" -Salem

"did I see a chair fly? I think I did! Time for popcorn!" -ratdude747
RJARRRPCGP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2012, 05:46 PM   #48
shovenose
Send Doge Memes
 
shovenose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
City & State: Fairfax, California
My Country: USA
I'm a: Forum Junkie
Posts: 6,142
Default Re: Firefox/Waterfox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

This still works I'm surpised they haven't fixed these changes into the new versions.
Even on a lousy iMac Core 2 Duo running Windows 7 it's much snappier browsing.
__________________
2001 Suburban, 2010 Escape.
shovenose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 11:14 AM   #49
DJduck
Badcaps Veteran
 
DJduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
City & State: Tartu
My Country: Estonia
Line Voltage: 220VAC 50Hz
I'm a: Student Tech
Posts: 224
Default Re: Firefox/Waterfox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

This is black magic Thanks, its faster now (using wifi)
DJduck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 11:04 PM   #50
TELVM
Badcaps Veteran
 
TELVM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
City & State: Madrid
My Country: Spain
Line Voltage: 230V 50Hz
I'm a: Knowledge Seeker
Posts: 534
Default Re: Firefox/Waterfox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

Couple extra tips for even more speeding of Firefox or any other browser.


Move the browser cache onto a ramdisk

or

Put the browser cache directly in memory


Attached Images
File Type: jpg About·cache.jpg (41.6 KB, 5 views)
TELVM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2013, 11:50 PM   #51
mariushm
Badcaps Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2011
City & State: Romania
Line Voltage: 230VAC 50Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 3,719
Default Re: Firefox/Waterfox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

So much bad advice and so much reviving of old threads... it's annoying.

Seriously, it's stupid to keep the cache in ram, if it was normal it would have been enabled by default.

Caching to ram prevents Firefox from caching stuff between browser restarts therefore nullifying anything that was cached in the session you just finished. So next time you start Firefox, you download everything because the cache is empty.

ffs leave the caching to disk, and leave it to write as much as needed. You have lots of crap cached between sessions, javascript resources, icons, logos, css stylesheets, facebook and youtube stuff, a lot.
Firefox will reuse them after you restart and save you bandwidth and improve the speed of rendering.

When Firefox will save to cache something, it uses basic windows functions to create the file on disk and to write the contents to it.
That means Windows (the OS and the NTFS drivers) intercepts the content that's written to disk and the location and besides delaying the write to disk (disk caching etc), it also keeps this content in RAM until other applications demand memory and the OS is forced to make room.

You won't get hard disk hits unless Windows was forced to remove that file from memory to make room for other applications or certain time threshold is reached or the file was touched by another application on disk (invalidates cache).



12 days of uptime, 10 GB of unused memory currently used by Windows to keep files I've accessed (read or written to) in cache for fast access... the Firefox cache in large majority is there already, the drive won't get hit for anything except updating last access time and crap like that, and that's done in a quick burst.


Besides this normal caching of various scripts and files that are explicitly marked as "can be cached by the browser", Firefox already keeps in memory by default the resources of the tab you're using, and the previous state (so you can click Back and get instant result).. so really when you click on a website on a link, 90% of the time the stuff that's supposed to be read from cache is already in memory from the fact that the page was loaded already.
So the cache helps most if you start the browser the next day and visit a website again, and ram cache screws this up, cause it's lost when you close the browser.
It's STUPID.


---------

And I think I've already said in this thread... the original advice is not really all that great:

Quote:
Set "network.http.pipelining" to "true"

Set "network.http.proxy.pipelining" to "true"

Set "network.http.pipelining.maxrequests" to some number like 30. This means it will make 30 requests at once.
The value of 30 is too high and it has the potential to slow down the pages. Yes, you get the page all at a time, but much slower.

A much saner value would be about 8-10.

===
Explanation :

A website page is made of several files: the html file/code , the stylesheet or stylesheets, javascript files, pictures, other files

There are some hard limits in the browsers, by default a browser will only make 2-4 parallel connections to a domain or IP, so normally several connections are made and files are retrieved one at a time through each connection.
But it takes some time to create the connection to the site and request a file (script, css, js, picture, whatever), depending on how far you are from the server where the website is hosted it can take hundreds of milliseconds to a second.
So normally, it takes a bit to create the connection, request the file, close the connection. Repeat.

Pipelining simply changes this by not closing the connection and connecting again. The browser loses some time connecting initially, then the moment a file is downloaded, instead of closing the connection it just requests another file.

===

The maxrequests, this value, doesn't mean it makes 30 requests at once, but rather how many files the browser will download through a connection it created with the website. If you put 30 there, it just means that the browser will keep using that connection as long as less than 30 files were downloaded through that connection.

But the browser restricts the number of separate connections to a small value, 2 to 4 connections usually, so you actually want files to be pipelined to save time and not disconnect and connect so much, but you also don't want those four connections to be constantly used, or blocked by some slow transfers for a long time. Some ISPs also throttle connections after some amount of data is sent, so with such provider, you don't want to download 30 pictures on a connection, because you may get the first 200-500 KB super fast and then everything slows down.

If the website is resource heavy and has for example 100 pictures served from the same domain as the main page, you'll block your four connections downloading pipelined pictures and the page won't render because the browser is unable to create a 5th connection to get the js scripts or whatever else is required. Leave the value of max requests lower to 8-10, to force connections to be freed for such websites.

It's precisely due to websites that advertise this trick that sites like Google Maps has to resort to tricks like serving the pictures from several subdomains, so that each domain gets its own connections.
Otherwise, the 50-100 pictures on the page would get pipelined and loaded slowly by the browser.

Microsoft also does it :



By using ecn.dynamic.t0 , .t1 , .t2 , .t3 they go around the browsers' limitations of 2-4 connections per host and prevent pipelining, because it's important for each small image to be loaded fast, not to have 20 pictures requested on a single connection that may be throttled by the isp.

So.

* leave the caching to disk as it is, you only have to lose by caching to ramdisk or to ram. Windows caches in background to ram everything anyway.

* enable pipelining, it's good. BUT NOT ALL THE TIME, so compromise by setting a small maxrequests... 6-10 .. even 15 will be ok. 30 is often too much.

Too much pipelining only gives you the feeling the pages load faster. Instead, the page is blanck for longer time and then you get the page shown instantly, but if you time it, the pages may actually load completely in a longer time.
Attached Images
File Type: png memory.png (22.1 KB, 231 views)
File Type: png bing.png (709.4 KB, 234 views)

Last edited by mariushm; 01-24-2013 at 12:19 AM..
mariushm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 12:38 AM   #52
pfrcom
Oldbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
City & State: Melbourne, Victoria
My Country: Australia
Line Voltage: 240v
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 982
Default Re: Firefox/Waterfox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mariushm View Post
The value of 30 is too high
With clean installs of recent Firefox(es), including 18.0.1, network.http.pipelining.maxrequests is set to 32 by default
__________________
better to keep quiet and be thought a fool, than to open your mouth and remove all doubt
pfrcom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 01:45 AM   #53
TELVM
Badcaps Veteran
 
TELVM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
City & State: Madrid
My Country: Spain
Line Voltage: 230V 50Hz
I'm a: Knowledge Seeker
Posts: 534
Default Re: Firefox/Waterfox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mariushm View Post
... it's stupid to keep the cache in ram, if it was normal it would have been enabled by default ...
And so it is :

Browser.cache.memory.enable (default: true)

Browser.cache.memory.capacity (default: -1)
TELVM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 07:37 AM   #54
mariushm
Badcaps Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2011
City & State: Romania
Line Voltage: 230VAC 50Hz
I'm a: Hobbyist Tech
Posts: 3,719
Default Re: Firefox/Waterfox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by pfrcom View Post
With clean installs of recent Firefox(es), including 18.0.1, network.http.pipelining.maxrequests is set to 32 by default
The 32 is basically a default value here, like "Unlimited", it's not an optimized value.
Remember, the about:config values are safe values, that must work for every computer in the world, they're not tuned for performance.

Have you read from the bug reports how this cache works?

This cache is different than the disk cache... it's used to hold in memory uncompressed gif icons, png icons decoded as bmp for faster rendering etc, and the default value is -1, which is sort of auto. As you close tabs, they get deleted from memory after some timeout value automatically.

It's not used like the disk cache is used, which holds files the website says that can be cached, between sessions and all that.

I incorrectly assumed from your device that it replaces the actual disk cache, which it doesn't. I never bothered to read about it before because simply from its name I know it's a bad idea.

And hint: there's also about:memory in firefox, which tells you a lot about where memory is used.
mariushm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2013, 03:56 AM   #55
trotskey
New Member
 
trotskey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
City & State: Lancashire
My Country: United Kingdom
I'm a: Knowledge Seeker
Posts: 12
Default Re: Firefox/Waterfox and Broadband users, READ THIS!!

Followed the advise to the point of setting network.http.pipelining.maxrequests to 12 and it seems faster. I use FF/Tor/Ixquick together which is not good for speed but it does seem better,
thanks,
Dave
trotskey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Badcaps.net Technical Forums © 2003 - 2019
Powered by vBulletin ®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:31 PM.
Did you find this forum helpful?