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-   -   Nintendo Wii power supply (https://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=90934)

Eaglecrest 12-06-2020 05:52 PM

Nintendo Wii power supply
 
I received a Wii that when plugged in the red light comes on the system, which I believe means the unit is seeing power. As I understand pushing the power button on the unit then powers it on and turns the light green.

When I push the power button nothing happens. I have another system and tried that power supply and the lights come on (green). I then tried the questionable supply on the other unit (which is know to work) and the same thing, red light but nothing more.

I opened the supply case and one of the capacitors seems to be bulging. The part says

Huhanog
JGL-(2016)
470 uF 16V
-40 +105C

When I look for part is there anything I need to consider other than 470uF 16V? I am also assuming that 20% should be sufficient. Advice appreciated.

fenugrec 12-06-2020 07:10 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Assuming your diagnostic is correct and that particular capacitor is indeed the problem.

To state the obvious - match physical size as closely as possible (pin spacing, external dimensions). I'd also pick one with also a +105C rating. And of course only buy replacement parts with proper datasheets which give lifetime estimates etc...
While you're in there look closely at the other caps too.

Eaglecrest 12-06-2020 07:21 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Thanks Fenugrec,

No harm in trying the switch and part shouldn't be too expensive to try. Other caps look fine, but if it doesn't come to life I will try them as well.

fenugrec 12-06-2020 08:45 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Eaglecrest (Post 1006903)
No harm in trying the switch and part shouldn't be too expensive to try.

Agreed. But when I'm ordering parts and unsure of the extent of the damage I'll usually add some of the surrounding / suspicious parts too especially jellybean stuff like Alu caps.

japlytic 12-07-2020 12:19 AM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
With regard to the particular brand of capacitor, is this a low cost compatible unit?

Heihachi_73 12-07-2020 03:09 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
9 Attachment(s)
Just for reference, I have uploaded some photos of an Australian Wii power adapter RVL-002(AUS), manufactured by Zebra. It is most likely the same as the European/UK 230V version but with a different AC mains plug.

If anyone has an American or Japanese Wii adapter to show, it would be interesting to see the differences.

This thing was a pain to open. Not only did it have 2 gamebit screws (same size as the ones on a SNES/N64 console), but the enclosure has four locking tabs, two on each side, and trying to get to them is extremely difficult as the gap between the two halves is almost microscopic.

Anyway, in the Australian Wii adapter, I was greeted with a nice set of Nippon Chemi-con caps, as opposed to the junk found in the OP's Wii adapter. Additionally, the AC plug is only clipped in, so it can be easily replaced if it breaks, or if you find one in the hard waste with the cord cut. Unfortunately though, the 12V side with the proprietary plug is soldered directly to the board so you'd be out of luck if that end was cut off.

Both the top and bottom halves of the enclosure have blank PCBs attached to the insides, presumably for a bit of safety similar to having a sheet of plastic in a PC power supply.

Now for the most important part, being on badcaps.net and all, electrolytics:

C2: NCC KXG 400V 82F 105C
C4: NCC LXV 35V 68F (temperature rating obscured, but assuming it's 105C)
C9: NCC KZE 16V 2200F 105C
C12: NCC KZE 16V 1000F 105C

Spitz 12-08-2020 10:03 AM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Eaglecrest (Post 1006903)
Thanks Fenugrec,

No harm in trying the switch and part shouldn't be too expensive to try. Other caps look fine, but if it doesn't come to life I will try them as well.

While you have it open, re-solder the transformer and the coil. I have fixed two wii power supplies that have shown no other problems this way. The solder did not even look bad on one, but the re-solder fixed it.

PeteS in CA 12-08-2020 12:18 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Heihachi_73 (Post 1007104)
...
C4: NCC LXV 35V 68F (temperature rating obscured, but assuming it's 105C)
...

The LXV series is an older non-aqueous low impedance series, so it is a 105C rated part.

As for the part mentioned in the OP, probably a UCC/NCC LXZ or KZE series part would be suitable, though it may have other questionable quality electrolytics elsewhere.

Eaglecrest 12-09-2020 07:25 AM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
japlytic, I don't understand the question.

I was given the Wii and I described what happened when I tried to fire it up. I appreciate the advice, which seems good; however, not really looking to rebuild the entire unit. Replacing all the caps is probably a good idea, which I may follow. I am not looking to put a lot of money in to this, at least until I know what I am getting into.

My electronics knowledge is very basic thus my question. Reading the forums here and elsewhere, I took a look at the power supply for anything that might be indicative, particularly caps. The one I mentioned looked to have a slight bulge so I suspected this was the problem. I was hoping to determine if there was anything in particular that needed to be considered, such as tolerance. Nothing was marked on the cap and I wasn't sure if a 20% tolerance would be acceptable here or if I needed more.

fenugrec's suggestion to make sure I get one with a spec sheet is great, but again I have limited understanding of the implications of all the data. In the end I went to a local Microcenter and picked up this one:

https://www.nteinc.com/capacitor_web/pdf/nev_neh.pdf

If i read this correctly, it has a load life of 1000 hrs @85C. That seems like a high temperature, but then again perhaps the local environment within the case could be that high. But that still seems more than I would be expecting. This would translate to less than 3 years of life expectancy. Of course that would mean 24 x 7 usage, which these systems aren't used at. Thought as I understand, the unit stay in a kind of sleep mode 24 x 7 so it can update and communicate with a server. So I don't know if this part is appropriate or not.

I installed the cap and tested it out. Got the red light again, but this time when hitting the power button the unit came to life and the green light lite. There was a disc left inside the unit and eject worked fine.

Eaglecrest 12-09-2020 07:32 AM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
spitz, for a neophyte can you explain further. Regarding re-solder, are you suggesting reflowing the solder present or removing and resoldering?

As I mentioned, I did get the power supply working and can still address the two components you suggested. I may also consider replacing the other caps; however, they look fine. The cost of the components isn't much, but finding the right ones for a lower cost can be. Microcenter, where I got the replacement, has very limited stock and I consider myself very lucky to find it there. On line sources, of course, charge postage and it is considerable vs. the part cost. Don't seem to be many local sources anymore.

At any rate, putting a disc into the unit doesn't produce any sounds, i.e., indexing the disc. No video either. Do you have any suggestions as to best approach further troubleshooting?

BTW, I did take some pictures of this US supply and will upload when I get a chance.

stj 12-09-2020 10:35 AM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
always remove the old solder and put new.
if you just add then the solders may be incompatable and create a sludge.

Eaglecrest 12-09-2020 10:47 AM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
stj, thank you. Seems reasonable, but if sludge is a potential problem then it seems you need to clean pads completely. Is that correct? I find it near impossible to remove all (or too many time more than most) of the past solder. No doubt my technique could use improvement. Suction will not remove the base solder and I find desoldering braid doesn't seem to work well for me. Comments or suggestions welcome.

stj 12-09-2020 01:15 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
your using what, a hand-pump ?
put a bit of rubber sleeve on the end to get a better seal against the iron/track

Eaglecrest 12-09-2020 02:33 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
My suction pump has some issues, but between that and a squeeze bulb, plus wick. Rubber? These things have Teflon nose pieces to handle the heat, rubber would just melt. Or are you suggesting heat shrink tubing?

stj 12-09-2020 06:41 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
hellerman sleeves

fenugrec 12-10-2020 12:17 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Eaglecrest (Post 1007557)
I find desoldering braid doesn't seem to work well for me.

Try putting a drop of flux on the braid just before pressing down on it with the iron against the pad. And be extra careful ; easy to rip off pads if you let the solder solidify (i.e. braid stuck to pad)

Spitz 12-12-2020 07:32 AM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Eaglecrest (Post 1007500)
spitz, for a neophyte can you explain further. Regarding re-solder, are you suggesting reflowing the solder present or removing and resoldering?

I use a solder sucker to remove the old solder and use rosin core solder and let it flow around the pin. Heavy items like transformers break away from the solder and cause intermittent connections. Just re-flow all the pins cause you cannot always see a bad connection.

Eaglecrest 12-12-2020 08:58 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Spitz, thank you. The question is what does re-flow mean. Just heating up the current solder to let it flow again, i.e., reflow? Or does it mean to remove the old and then flow new solder to reflow solder into the joint? You seem to indicate the former and stj the latter. Is there a standard definition for re-flow or is it up to individual interpretation?

stj 12-12-2020 09:26 PM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
re-solder usually means to remove the old solder and put new,

re-flow usually refers to putting flux on the old solder and then melting it again.

Spitz 12-13-2020 09:10 AM

Re: Nintendo Wii power supply
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Eaglecrest (Post 1008304)
Spitz, thank you. The question is what does re-flow mean. Just heating up the current solder to let it flow again, i.e., reflow? Or does it mean to remove the old and then flow new solder to reflow solder into the joint? You seem to indicate the former and stj the latter. Is there a standard definition for re-flow or is it up to individual interpretation?

I agree with stj as far as definitions go. What I want to see is the solder flow into the hole and build a pyramid around the pin. I use solder with flux inside so I don"t add flux. If I don't see it flow evenly around the pin, then I suck the solder away and add new. If it does not flow around the pin then either its not hot enough or there are contaminates on the pin. With practice you will see what I mean.


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